Why is it Important to Manage Information on Your Contacts? (Face-to-Face Networking Book 11)

Why Networking in Person Still Matters
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What came through on the course was they were saying network, network, network.

Why Should You Care?

Real potential for collaboration. Share any knowledge you feel would be useful for them. Social media is changing our relationship styles in several important ways. Sincere interest in the other person -- even flattery or encouragement -- is a form of generosity. When you talk to them, ask for three tips on what they feel makes them successful. Many cases of unintentional fame have led its victims to take legal action.

However, a number of interviewees spoke at length about their personal distaste at this activity, because they were uncomfortable with the instrumentality implicit in networking, particularly for career or influence, sycophancy, or inauthentic behaviour. However, several interviewees who expressed this discomfort went on to say that they had later come to recognise the value and importance of networking and that they had eventually overcome their qualms in this regard:.

It just felt like that to me. But as you mature which I did when I started, you realise how important it is. Although networking is often a form of socialisation for managers, it is clear that managers were notequally socialised into engaging in networking activity, over time accepting its apparent importance or inevitability and attempting to suppress their disinclination or compensate through the development of networking skills.

Many of those interviewed are committed and self-conscious networkers, able and willing to speak at length about their networking strategies and practices and often able to identify the benefits of their networking for their own effectiveness and for their organisation. As noted, many of these have been effectively socialised as a networked manager through training programmes, advice and encouragement from leaders and mentors and through their established membership of professional and clinical associations and groups.

THE IMPORTANCE OF NETWORKING SUPPORT

The challenge for the networked managers is typically how to engage in this activity in a way that appears natural rather than instrumental, avoiding the appearance of manipulative or self-serving behaviour. The line in particular between instrumental and organic networking is difficult to draw, in part because frequently instrumental networking is only effective if it presented as natural networking.

Networking frequently fails when the instrumental intent in forming a relationship is explicit, as described by one interviewee:. One colleague. The obvious inference is that most effective networked managers present themselves as skilled social performers who can network deliberately and strategically with a focus on a goal while ensuring that this appears both authentic and natural. There are also occasions, such as formal networking events, when all participants engage in networking based openly on mutual benefit and, for example, knowledge sharing.

The consequence of this may be the formation of goal-orientated networks that provide mutual benefit. Alongside the challenge of networks, there is the particular issue of isolates — those individuals and groups who lack the requisite connections to acquire knowledge, influence actions, forge careers and build supportive relationships. The particular subgroup of managers who most commonly described themselves as lacking in networks was general managers. Roles such as the service manager suffered particularly from a combination of intensity of work pressure, infrequency of contact with managers in similar positions, an absence of a standard training route into the role that may form cohort relationships and a lack of dedicated formal networks to share knowledge and best practice.

The damaging impact of this, in terms of the challenge of acquiring knowledge, building career, representing their interests and building support networks, was particularly noticeable among this group. There is frequently a perception that the isolation of particular groups of managers, in terms of their lack of networks, is not a particular concern of the trusts themselves.

Specifically, this isolation is often seen to be a personal rather than an organisational issue and the employing organisation is seen to be predominantly focused on the output rather than the activity of management:. However, the comparative absence of network opportunities, as well as a question mark over the ability of wider, more institutionalised managerial networks to provide a basis for knowledge sharing and learning, , does raise important questions about what opportunities organisations might be missing to benefit from this aspect of management development.

The study suggests four broad reasons for networking: for knowledge, for support, for career development and for influence. These motives may overlap and synergies exist between particular approaches to networking. At the same time, a range of particular issues impedes or undermines networking within the modern NHS. We discuss these in detail before concluding by reviewing the importance of networking in the sector and the distinctive way that the various management groups attempt to form, and benefit from, networks to enhance their effectiveness and resilience as managers.

Turn recording back on. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Search term. Chapter 6 Networks and networking. Greg, general, Acute The quote above indicates the latent potential within the NHS, in terms of breadth and depth of knowledge and experience, both clinical and managerial, and the frustration felt when this potential goes unfulfilled. Understanding networks in health care Social, managerial and organisational research has adopted the concept of the network with some relish in the late 20th century. Varieties of networks As a consequence of the methodological approach adopted, a wide range and variety of networks were identified and explored through the interviews and the ethnographic encounters.

Who networks and why? The key motives were: networking for knowledge. Networking for knowledge The primary purpose of networking, for almost all managers interviewed, was to acquire or share knowledge. Adrian, functional, Specialist Active networking for knowledge we refer to as problem-solving. Adrian, functional, Specialist Less formal, structured problem-solving networks include the action learning sets established on many development programmes. Those formed during the NHS GMTS were highlighted by a number of interviewees, building on the strong group relationships formed during extended training and induction programmes: I mean, I still stay in touch pretty much weekly with probably 15 others from the GMTS.

Thomas, functional, Specialist This knowledge sharing is, therefore, supported strongly by the establishment of trust and underpinned frequently by long-term personal relationships and affiliations outside the work environment. Gloria, general, Acute Although, in principle, networking for knowledge is the most instrumental and practical mode of networking, it frequently has a complementary relationship with other, less pragmatic, modes of networking, an issue that is returned to in Complementarity of networking.

Networking for support Networking for support represented the second most cited motive for forming and maintaining networks: the reliance on such relationships for emotional reassurance, personal validation, consolation, or for the expression of feelings outside of the immediate work context. Elena, general, Care Broadly, it seems, this aspect of networking is frequently ignored or under-represented in research in this area, but is one that a substantial number of managers interviewed find invaluable, given the increasing tensions and pressures of their everyday roles. Networking for career advancement The role of networking in supporting the career advancement of managers was discussed by just less than one-third of those interviewed.

11 Tips to Help You Network Better!

A number of interviewees also pointed to the emphasis placed on encouraging this mode of networking by key management and leadership development programmes in the NHS: One of the big things they tell you pretty much on day one is that one of the main focuses on the Graduate Scheme is networking.

Thomas, functional, Specialist Networking for career development was practised either collectively or individually. Glen, clinical, Care Individually, career networking normally builds on some kind of formal or informal mentorship arrangement. Stewart, general, Acute Similar to the notion of networking for support, there is often a sensitivity to suggestions that this may be behaviour that is in some sense inauthentic, instrumental or even manipulative.

Danielle, functional, Specialist Reflecting this sensitivity, several interviewees who described themselves as engaging in career networking deny that their career progression is dependent on their social capital, or argue that any career networking was marginal in its impact, or that their own networking itself was unintentional or not strategic: I was interested in the work-life balance thing. Jessica, functional, Acute Overall, this particular practice was highly valued, despite deep ambivalence about the practice in some quarters and a widespread recognition among those who engaged in career networking that it required sophisticated interpersonal skills to enact successfully.

Networking for influence The specific use of networking in order to secure some influence over a decision or behaviour in another organisational location was the least common outcome or intention of networking in the study, mentioned by only 11 interviewees. Ross, general, Care In terms of networking practices, a broad distinction could be made between networking based on a reciprocal exchange of favours and a broader attempt to push or represent a particular agenda through links with senior management, key role-holders or influential external parties.

Christian, general, Acute Effective networking for influence relies partially on a particular understanding of organisations and relationships, a specific set of interpersonal skills to effectively build up influence and, crucially, time in the field, as all involved describe the process of building up contacts as one which is lengthy and time-consuming. Complementarity of networking It is important to note that although these motives were identifiably distinctive, in the actual practice of networking — introducing oneself to a colleague, forwarding on an e-mail, attending a conference — individuals may be driven by a combination of motives and indeed the same activity may result in a combination of outcomes which do not fit neatly into any one of the categories described above.

Challenges to networking Across these overlapping and interconnected motivations for networking, a number of issues are raised consistently as obstacles to effective networking and, by implication, as obstacles to effective performance and career development. The impact of the substantial and often increasing pressure of work on the ability to network was substantial and felt especially acutely when managers attempted to engage in the less formal networking, such as establishing a relationship with a mentor, or maintaining learning sets after the completion of a training programme: We had learning sets with, you know, people from similar roles, backgrounds, et cetera, which I found really, really useful.

Everybody is under such huge pressure now, there is just no time to do anything Belinda, general, Acute I find that the clinical networks are out there but fitting it into the day job, you know? Danielle, functional, Specialist In practice, and with little immediate prospect of a significant decrease in work intensity, the challenge, even for those convinced by the importance of networking, is to maintain a balance so as to protect this long-term activity in the face of more immediate work demands.

Laura, general, Care The potential for knowledge exchange through networks is most clearly impeded by the presence of competitive tensions between trusts. This obstacle was affirmed by a number of interviewees across the trusts, but particularly among general and functional managers and most frequently in the acute and care trusts: When we meet, we are directorate managers, same level, but also, we are working for a foundation trust.

Hasin, general, Care The barriers described here related not only to information of a commercially sensitive nature, as might be expected, but also to knowledge that was not clearly confidential, such as lessons learned from experience in a particular area, guidance on good practices or even information on future developments which were not widely announced. Greg, general, Acute Elsewhere, these formal competitive tensions appear to be more stratified, presenting more rigid barriers to formal requests to knowledge sharing, but allowing a freer exchange of information through managerial tiers in which personal networks have been established.

Bridget, functional, Acute A final, and more individual, obstacle to networking lay in the personal discomfort in engaging in networking and, for some, their lack of the often sophisticated interpersonal skills necessary to network effectively.

Finding Your Allies - Career Development Skills From rapyzure.tk

Pavak, general, Specialist However, a number of interviewees spoke at length about their personal distaste at this activity, because they were uncomfortable with the instrumentality implicit in networking, particularly for career or influence, sycophancy, or inauthentic behaviour. Felix, functional, Acute Although networking is often a form of socialisation for managers, it is clear that managers were notequally socialised into engaging in networking activity, over time accepting its apparent importance or inevitability and attempting to suppress their disinclination or compensate through the development of networking skills.

The networked manager and the isolated manager Many of those interviewed are committed and self-conscious networkers, able and willing to speak at length about their networking strategies and practices and often able to identify the benefits of their networking for their own effectiveness and for their organisation. Networking frequently fails when the instrumental intent in forming a relationship is explicit, as described by one interviewee: One colleague. Pavak, general, Specialist The obvious inference is that most effective networked managers present themselves as skilled social performers who can network deliberately and strategically with a focus on a goal while ensuring that this appears both authentic and natural.

Beth, general, Care However, the comparative absence of network opportunities, as well as a question mark over the ability of wider, more institutionalised managerial networks to provide a basis for knowledge sharing and learning, , does raise important questions about what opportunities organisations might be missing to benefit from this aspect of management development.

Summary The study suggests four broad reasons for networking: for knowledge, for support, for career development and for influence. This work was produced by Bresnen et al.

  1. Networking venues.
  2. 11 Tips to Help You Network Better!?
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This issue may be freely reproduced for the purposes of private research and study and extracts or indeed, the full report may be included in professional journals provided that suitable acknowledgement is made and the reproduction is not associated with any form of advertising. Chapter 6, Networks and networking. In this Page. Introduction Understanding networks in health care Varieties of networks Who networks and why?

Complementarity of networking Challenges to networking The networked manager and the isolated manager Summary. Other titles in this collection. Health Services and Delivery Research. Recent Activity. Clear Turn Off Turn On.

Start by telling them about the problem and then your solution. Include lots of information on how disastrous things were before it came to a happy ending, where everything worked out for the better. One of the main goals of networking is not only to meet one or two people, but also to tap into the network of the people you are meeting with. Each separate person you meet will know approximately another people, and if you can gain introductions to some of these contacts, you will quickly increase your network and your chances of finding an extremely valuable connection.

Ask your contacts if they can recommend a professional organisation or the names of some of the people you should be talking with. If you want to establish rapport with another person, create a reason to keep the relationship going. If you read an article that adds to a discussion you had during a networking meeting, save it and send it to them with a brief note on what you found interesting and how you think it could benefit them.

Try and find at least two or three opportunities yearly to reconnect with the members of your network. Building a network is about creating a genuine, caring relationship. Thank your connection for the information they have given and see if you can help them in any way. Share any knowledge you feel would be useful for them. Keep notes on what you learn about your contacts so your future correspondence can have a personalised touch.

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Ensure your online profile is always up-to-date. Recruiters often use social media platforms to probe potential candidates, and even to check out your skills and experience. These few basic rules will help you succeed at networking. Remember, the goal at networking is to build relationships and networks. A good, reliable network can result in new customers, partners and opportunities. Get out there and meet people, but ensure you are following these networking tips to make sure you are meeting people in the right way. Want to study at Kangan Institute?

You can find out about the course on our website , call us on , or apply online now. Read This First.

How To Connect With Powerful And Influential People

Last updated: 11 April Demonstrate your value to potential clients and employers with these simple successful networking tips: 1. Leverage Social Media Social media is an effective way to get to know important contacts better and without the pressure of a face to face meeting that you may not be prepared for. Try and find at least two or three opportunities yearly to reconnect with the members of your network.

What Is an Ally?

(Face-to-Face Networking Book 11) - Kindle edition by Kathy Condon. Similar books to Why is it Important to Manage Information on Your Contacts?. Networking Book 11). ASIN: B00BF8AL5U. What Will You Discover When You Read This Book? The tools for face-to-face networking are easy to obtain. The.

Building a network is about creating a genuine, caring relationship. Thank your connection for the information they have given and see if you can help them in any way. Share any knowledge you feel would be useful for them. Keep notes on what you learn about your contacts so your future correspondence can have a personalised touch. Ensure your online profile is always up-to-date. Recruiters often use social media platforms to probe potential candidates, and even to check out your skills and experience.

These few basic rules will help you succeed at networking. Remember, the goal at networking is to build relationships and networks. A good, reliable network can result in new customers, partners and opportunities. Get out there and meet people, but ensure you are following these networking tips to make sure you are meeting people in the right way. Want to study at Kangan Institute? You can find out about the course on our website , call us on , or apply online now. Read This First. Last updated: 11 April Demonstrate your value to potential clients and employers with these simple successful networking tips: 1.

Leverage Social Media Social media is an effective way to get to know important contacts better and without the pressure of a face to face meeting that you may not be prepared for. Use Your Resume as a Tool for Advice Another easy yet highly effective way to network during a job search is to ask others who you have established a relationship with to review your resume and give you feedback on how to improve it.

Shy? Here’s 17 ways to network anyway

Ask some of the following questions: How long have you been with this company? Or how long have you been in this field? What do you like or dislike about your job? What type of training did you need for this position? What is the culture of this company? Present A Success Story Once you have found a topic the other person may be interested in and you can offer advice on, present a solution by telling a story about how you helped other in a similar situation.