Mystic Island (Nikki OConnor series Book 1)

Mystic Island
Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Mystic Island (Nikki OConnor series Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Mystic Island (Nikki OConnor series Book 1) book. Happy reading Mystic Island (Nikki OConnor series Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Mystic Island (Nikki OConnor series Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Mystic Island (Nikki OConnor series Book 1) Pocket Guide.

Celestial and Roy are young, black, middle-class, and in love. She is an artist and Roy is a promising executive. After serving five years of a twelve-year prison sentence, his conviction is overturned. We witness the devastation of a marriage and friendships. The characters are well-developed and memorable. Jones makes many references to black culture, prose, poetry, and music and leaves us with much material to digest and process.

This is a novel well worth reading. The bias starts early. In the course of Lipman's research, she found that "once children hit school age, teachers- even female teachers- subconsciously believe boys are better at math than girls. In one study, when a group of teachers graded math tests with no names on them, the girls outscored the boys. But when another group of teachers graded the same tests with names, the results were reversed: they gave higher grades to the boys than the girls.

All of the teachers, by the way, were female. Men are not the enemy. Men feel resentful and victimized. Men have a different response: they yell! There is a separate section of footnotes if you care to follow up on a particular study cited. I was surprised at how such a complicated and potentially dry subject could be so entertaining. Lipman's achievement is that the book is simultaneously resonant and fascinating.

The Talmud says: "If someone comes to kill you, rise up and kill him first. The author does not just describe the events but explores the moral ramifications as well. The many photographs add a visual element to this gripping book. This is truly a must-read for anyone interested in the modern history of the Middle East and the world at large. This new graphic memoir written and illustrated by Chast of The New Yorker fame is both a primer on how to live in Manhattan, a bit of personal history, and a funny and charming love letter to the city of New York.

Begun as a guide to give her daughter who was moving from the suburbs to Manhattan where Chast lived for a long time , this book teaches the tourist or the person who just moved to Manhattan how to get around on foot, how to use the subway, how to understand addresses, and much more. But it is also for people who love the city and want to see it from a different point of view. This is a fast-paced suspense thriller. At the beginning, I was reading so quickly I forgot to note the quality of the writing, which was quite good.

A private plane takes off from Martha's Vineyard and within minutes the plane crashes and there are only two survivors, a 4-year-old boy and a passenger who embarked at the last moment. He saves the boy by swimming with him to safety. The novel looks at the passengers' lives before the crash; each chapter features a passenger or investigator.

Hawley delves into each character, who initially exists only on the surface. We get to know them as admirable, flawed human beings. The plot moves forward by small, chance encounters, just as in life. They are some biting lines and commentary. One of the characters, Layla, is vaping, while another looks at her and observes, "This is what the future looks like.

We smoke technology now. They do not give you facts or truth or even an accurate account of an event but speculation and innuendo instead. They literally manufacture the news. We live in a ubiquitous hour news cycle that is corrupting public discourse. There is even a name for it now: "hate porn. Don't forget that this is a really good story. This collection of essays features more than forty portraits of leading Jewish thinkers, artists, scientists, and other public figures of the last hundred years who, in their own unique ways, engaged with and helped shape the modern world.

The writers are a diverse group of leading international scholars. This is a welcome new book and the photos are well-chosen. Although a tiny book in size, there are 26 delicious Jewish appetizers and party snack recipes representing different countries around the world. Stories filled with historical and personal context, photographs for each dish, helpful tips on how to create a Jewish cheese plate, and what foods to buy rather than make are bonuses to the recipes.

Traditional Jewish foods have been modernized. Gefilte fish is now gefilte fritters. Little Book of Appetizers makes for a thoughtful thank you gift. One is unlikely to meet many characters in literature like Emerence the name means worthy of merit. She is a cleaner, housekeeper, and concierge for many people in her Budapest Pest neighborhood. Emerence is physically powerful and expresses her opinions like a general giving orders to her troops. Secrets, complex and hidden, surround the reader, such as: What was going on in this neighborhood for the past 40 years?

What do we really know about the past? There are clues and hints everywhere that build the tension in this quietly dramatic page-turner. I always find it fascinating reading books that take place in another era. My Hungarian customers assure me the translator got it right. This English version comes nearly 30 years after the original publication date. Rolling Stone magazine is known as much for its excellent journalism as its photographs so it is fitting that this generous coffee-table book is filled with both.

Among the many iconic pictures are snapshots that may be less known to you. Thompson wrote seminal pieces for the magazine. Profiles of popular music performers and politicians, and well as hard-hitting analyses of social issues have been featured in the magazine for decades. This book would make a great gift for any age, even a young person who is curious about the last several fascinating decades. Intriguing, riveting and tense, The Break reads like a mystery. Each chapter introduces yet another character who is related, directly and indirectly, to the victim.

The story is actually quite simple. Stella, a young mother, looks out her window and sees what seems like someone in trouble on the Break, a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house. Stella calls the police and the tale proceeds from there. The novel slowly unfolds as we see the characters grow, change, and deal with loss.

The book explores interesting facets of Aboriginal people living in a rural society and how different generations in one family can have completely separate views. The novel shows the inner workings of families as they all come together to deal with hardship. For people who love seeing how all the pieces and characters coalesce in the end, this is definitely a book I would recommend. It tackles relevant issues in our society and it is important that everyone, especially high school students, become aware of these issues. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and hope to read more books like this one.

It was all around, a happy time for most people. Students were on vacation. I never thought much of the history, meaning, or customs of Christmas. All that changed with Judith Flanders' fascinating and well-researched account in her new non-fiction book. For rulers it became a display of power. Flanders debunks commonly-held beliefs about the holiday in a witty and intelligent way. The book is fun to read in a way that such books usually are not. There is a consistent tone and intimacy to these photographs of well-known people in the arts, athletics, and political spheres.

Turning the pages is like going to an art gallery. There is an alphabetical listing of the subjects at the end of this gorgeous book. This would make a great gift during the holiday season. If you already read his entire bibliography, this publication should be a great addition to your collection, or if you just want a smart, funny, pretty book to give as a gift to a child, this is also a great choice. Krauss' latest novel is surprisingly original in its imaginative sweep or maybe not for those who have read her books before.

She poses some very mystical questions, like being in two places at once, or the harm we do ourselves by neglecting the spritual. And then we have some marvelous characters. Jules Epstein is an intelligent, rich, cultured New Yorker who wakes up one day and decides to give away much of his wealth. Nicole, like Krauss, is a writer who suffers from writer's block and is obsessed with the Tel Aviv Hilton, another 'character' in the book, which she thinks is the best example of ugly in architecture. Ruth Westheimer, and many, many more.

This book will make an excellent gift. Maybe dinosaurs don't have bedtimes, but little boys do. What does Mommy do when her little boy, Mo, is obsessed with dinosaurs and insists that he is one and can do everything dinosaurs can? This charming picture book helps answer the question through Mommy's playful interactions with Mo. Mo insists that dinosaurs don't have dinnertimes, bath times, milktimes, and definitely no bedtimes.

An English Bookshop

They are dirty, messy, cold, noisy, and never tired. Timothy Knapman's hilarious story, along with Nikki Dyson's funny, colourful and bigger than life art, make this story a perfect read-aloud bedtime story for children aged If you know Elizabeth Strout, you must read this latest novel; if you don't, you are in for a treat. Tolstoy taught us, "Each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way," and Strout just proves it again. The reader is placed, really projected, into the middle of a drama. Slowly, in an intriguing way, things become clear. Though hazy at first, clues are dropped that make one want to continue and discover where a particular thread of the story will lead.

Sometimes it's a name you haven't heard before or a peculiar gesture by one of the characters, or an awkward moment when three of the saddest, unhappy, poor children come together as adults understanding and caring for each other after 17 years. The writing is deceptively simple but powerful: "That cup of tea, Dottie saw, gave her permission to talk. A master of structure, Strout keeps us riveted to these inter-connected stories. I thought of this book as a large tapestry that you cannot take in all at once; you have to look closely to see specific details but pull back to see the integrated whole.

They remain days on which even Jews estranged from Judaism for much of the year come to synagogue, and the world's longest courtroom drama continues: the extended argument between God and His people about the fate of justice and the justice of fate that has been running since the day when Abraham first called God "Judge of all the earth," and that led Albert Einstein to speak about that "almost fanatical love of justice" that made him thank his stars that he was born a Jew.

Customers are always asking us for books on Canada which they can give as gifts to family and friends. Well, look no further. The companion book to the current exhibit at Ryerson University, The Faraway Nearby features hundreds of photographs of Canada during its first years seen through many different lenses, both photographic and categorical. Thoughtful essays are interspersed with the photos. Photos often tell stories that history forgot, such as the photograph of two young women doing aptitude tests in order to qualify for work at defense plants during the Second World War.

There is definitely something for everyone in this book. Three farmers commit suicide around the same time in a small village. Do you believe that? The novel depicts rural life of a moshava in s British Palestine and also transports you to the present. Varda, a young woman who is writing a history of the moshava, interviews Ruta, who has lived there since she was a child. Ruta tells a story that is markedly different than that found in the moshava archives.

The book is smart, wise, funny, and Shalev even gives us a great tip on how to make limoncello I enjoyed the biblical illusions, but don't be concerned- they are explained in the text. They add to the book's warm tone. The novel is violent at times as murder and revenge are present in the incredibly quiet, pastoral atmosphere. There is a strange feeling as the reader sympathizes with a murderer and is drawn in as the cycle of revenge takes over.

As usual, Shalev does not disappoint his faithful readers. This book, timed to coincide with Montreal's th anniversary, celebrates the urban art of the city. Feinberg's interest in this was piqued about ten years ago by the intricate images and social commentary of these works of art. The author also notes that these modern tapestries reflect the talent of the many men and women of our city.

The collection of photographs tells you where you can find the art, which was one of the author's main goals in cataloguing it in the first place. The book makes a great gift whether you live here or not. The book's design is striking and innovative. Each 2-page spread is a colourful infographic depicting, on one half of the book, something that is underground, and on the other half, something that is underwater.

It covers everything from tunnels made by wildlife to man-made installations. The text is in the form of speech bubbles next to what it is describing, so reading this book is a dynamic and fun activity. Enjoy it with the curious children in your life! This is a most unusual novel- it is in the form of a memoir. It's hard to imagine one could be executed for writing an opera but that was a real possibility in Soviet Russia, the night Stalin went to the opera and wrote a review. The composer, young Dmitri Shostakovich, fears for his life, his family, his music.

This is a struggle that will continue throughout his life. Shostakovich has constant "conversations with Power," i. Stalin, the bureaucracy, and its petty officials. At one point, he is so terrified of being taken away, he sleeps on the landing outside his apartment door with a packed suitcase so his wife won't see him being dragged away. The novel about the place of art in society is built on three "conversations with Power:" , when he writes his opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, his trip to America during which he extols the virtues of the Soviet Union, and finally, , when he agrees to join the Party.

Each one involves great shame, humiliation, fear, and profound feelings of cowardice. At the same time he is lauded as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. Will his music endure above The Noise of Time? Read the book, listen to his 5th symphony, or go to the opera.

You decide. Arturo Toscanini is regarded by many as one of the greatest conductors of the twentieth century, and this definitive biography by Sachs, a Toscanini scholar, is a must for any lover of classical music or well-researched books. He had a complex personal life alongside his famous musical successes, but his bold defiance against the tyrants of the era stands out in any time period. In , Toscanini refused to allow his La Scala orchestra to play the Fascist anthem "Glovinezza," despite much pressure from Mussolini.

As well, when tens of thousands of Jewish refugees streamed into Palestine in the late s, he traveled there to establish an orchestra of refugee musicians. The author had access to family archives and interviewed many relatives and associates in order to complete this monumental work. This is an excellent reference book for year olds. The colourful, eye-catching pages and short, simple text make it a perfect introduction to the solar system and exploration into space.

Both were inspired at an early age to follow space careers.

Top Authors

Mystic Island (Nikki O'Connor series Book 1) - Kindle edition by Jan Evan Whitford. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Dusk of Defiance (The Era of Ensemble Book 1) - Kindle edition by J.P. Woosey, Tom Woosey. Mystic Island (Nikki O'Connor series Book 1)Kindle Edition.

I highly recommend this book. Perhaps it will inspire our next generation of scientists or astronauts. Gundar-Goshen, winner of the Sapir Prize for best debut fiction, One Night, Markovitch, has written a novel which takes place in Israel, but it isn't about Zionism, or Judaism, or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Our main characters are African immigrants, Eritreans, Sudanese, and a brilliant neurosurgeon, Eitan Green, and his beautiful wife, who is a police detective.

Eitan's connection to his two young boys is so deep in ways not usually described in a father. There is plenty of humiliation, guilt, and love in this book. There is also extortion and shame. So many interesting themes in this fast-paced novel! If I had only one word to describe this novel it would be intense. This is an incredible box of treasures on Israel. Included are four books covering a multitude of cultural and intellectual fields; four DVDs featuring different aspects of what makes Israel special and unique; a photographic portfolio of 25 frameable prints celebrating wondrous landscapes; a USB flash drive featuring vignettes about Israeli achievements and innovators; and a limited-edition scarf designed especially for this project by Philip Blau and Helena Blaunstein.

This makes a great gift. It comes with a CD of 20 excerpts from recordings of important pieces written by well-known composers, ranging from Beethoven to Britten. All the music is selected because it is reminiscent of water, which the written parts of the book emphasize. The biographies of the composers and definitions of musical terms are adapted for children. This is a great gift for the children in your life. This is one of the best novels I have ever read. The novel opens on April 12, President Lincoln and his wife are hosting a ball; their young son Willie, upstairs, is deathly ill and dying.

The Civil War is raging and casualties are mounting. With this background, Saunders gives us one of the most beautifully written, sensitive accounts of love, grief, and endurance one can imagine. And that is even before we talk about slavery and ghosts! Yes, ghosts; not usually to my taste but this novel is at once a feat of imagination and utterly realistic. Even though we are among ghosts in the Bardo a transitional state in the Hindu religion for two hundred pages, it's amusing, funny, and at times, hilarious.

Each voice, each character, has his or her own distinctive tone. It is fun to guess who is speaking before you see the source, which brings me to the unusual collage structure of this novel, not always a straight narrative but always entertaining, with many voices, some contemporary newspaper or diary accounts, and a main character, Lincoln, to whom the reader needs no introduction. The ghosts are like a chorus commenting on Lincoln's grief, the tragedy of the Civil War, and the human condition, for any of us that still care.

New York in the first half of the twentieth century was an explosive time for art. There is currently a new exhibit of the work of Stettheimer, one of the great American artists of the century. The beautiful book combines reproductions of her artwork and poetry. This is a humourous picture book for children aged If you want to make dragons happy and get them on your side, throw a party and serve tacos. It can be any kind; chicken or beef, big or small.

Do not serve the tacos with spicy salsa. This will cause havoc- ears to smoke, sparks to fly, and definitely stomach upset. Unfortunately, the young boy in the story hosting the party didn't read the fine print on a jar of mild salsa. The playfully coloured illustrations with dragons of various sizes, shapes and colours enhance the amusing text and provide some clues that are not present in Rubin's words. This light-hearted, laugh-out-loud book is sure to entertain. This story will make you laugh, smile, and think.

If you have read Grossman before, you might wonder at a main character, Dovaleh Greenstein, who is a stand-up comic, but Grossman, among all his other talents, is superb at stand-up comedy. Regarding the soul, which requires "nonstop upkeep," he doesn't have the resources to maintain one: "Every single day, all day long, you gotta haul it in for servicing", so forget soul searching. The humor is painful at times; in a riff on Mengele, you will find yourself smiling inside and fearful at the same time, wanting relief from this joke, but one is unable to stop reading as this comedy speeds toward tragedy.

We continue on to explore how damaged one can be when brought up by parents who are survivors or escaped "seconds" before Mengele could "declare his short consultation: right, left, left, left You will laugh out loud as you realize how a sweet kid became a bully and an abused kid became an abuser. What does this imply for a country and its soul? Or is that too big a leap? Some reviewers have called it "shocking, raw, eloquent. Sandberg, the chief operating officer at Facebook and the author of Lean In, and Grant, a psychologist and Wharton professor, have written an eloquent book on tragic loss and the need to find a way to continue living.

Option B is much more than just a personal story, though. Through the telling of many others' stories, it is also an exploration of the uncanny human ability to persevere through emotional trauma and regain happiness. I expect that this book will offer reliable comfort to many people. This book, beautifully illustrated and written by R. Palacio, features Auggie from her bestselling chapter book, Wonder. The theme of acceptance will be easily understood by younger children. Auggie, the narrator of the story, is a ten-year-old boy who does ordinary things, but looks very different from others.

He is stared at, made fun of, and bullied by other children. In order to cope and feel normal, he escapes into the world of space with his dog, Daisy. Despite how poorly he is treated by others, he is not discouraged, but seems encouraged and hopeful about human capabilities. From the cover to the illustrations to the words, the story makes the point that we are all "wonders" and the importance of seeing beyond an individual's physical appearance.

It evokes much discussion and is a must-read for children and their parents. This novel is quirky, fun, sad, and elegant. As my friend Jackie, who recommended the book, said to me, "Sometimes you don't want the page to end, it's so delicious. If he steps outside, it will be off to Siberia. So he stays for over 30 years. One of the best parts of the book is the many, many colorful characters who pass through the Count's life during his confinement.

Nina, age nine, who calls him your Countship, is my favorite. Home is the big theme of this story. As Towles says, the Russians who love their land so much are the first people to send a person into exile at home! This is a novel to enjoy and relax with. The horrors of the era are still there but understated.

The Count confronts injustice and the insane bureaucracy using authority, order, and manners to ward off the chaos. Most pages will bring a smile to your face. If you were playing a word association game, and someone said the word 'Passover,' the first word out of your mouth will probably not be 'easy. What sets this book apart is the friendliness of the authors; you feel as if they are in the kitchen with you helping you through the preparations for the seder meals.

This new book by the Japanese author Megumi Iwasa is a delightful, simple, and funny tale about long-distance friendship. Letter writing, quite a rarity in our digital world, is key to the development of the story. The black ink illustrations add action and humour to the text. Giraffe, who lives in the African savanna, is bored and lonely and wants to share things with a friend. He wonders what is on the other side of the horizon. Giraffe writes a letter and gives it to Pelican, who operates a delivery service.

After a while, Pelican returns, but without a response. However, a letter soon arrives from Penguin, and with Pelican's help the two become pen-pals. Since they know nothing about each other, their letters are full of questions about appearances, habits, and surroundings. Children between the ages of 5 and 9 will learn, enjoy, cherish, and want to share this chapter book. The latest novel by this great Israeli writer poses the questions, "Are traitors always bad?

This is a novel of ideas, an allegory and a love story, take your pick! We meet three people from three generations. We find ourselves in Jerusalem in the winter of , not the chaotic, bustling government center of today but a sleepier dusty backwater.

Samuel Ash, a young university drop-out, is hired by Atalia, the beautiful daughter-in-law of Gershom Wald, an old member of the founding Zionist generation. Atalia hires him just to sit, talk, and argue with Wald. Shmuel is writing his thesis on the Jewish views of Jesus. In a few months of living together they change each other. Oz is a supreme storyteller and here his story is somewhat disturbing. The concept of the founding of the State as a questionable idea is contemplated, but then through Wald, Oz asks why Israel should be the first country to divest itself of the "sin" of nationalism?

This novel, which considers the contemporary meaning of Judas and whether all Jews are considered Judases in the eyes of the world, is a reminder that the author's political views have led some Israelis to call Oz a traitor. The quandaries and dilemmas are what make reading this book such a rewarding experience.

Thirteen Reasons Why is an extremely powerful novel and I was mesmerized while reading it. I was so engrossed in the story I practically read the book in one sitting. I could not put it down. The tale begins when Clay Jensen receives and plays the cassette tapes he received in a mysterious package. Clay spends the rest of the day and night listening to Hannah's voice and following it around town. The strong message of the impact, that even seemingly inconsequential actions and words can have on others, is universal.

Thirteen Reasons Why will have you glued to your seat and reading throughout the night. This will be my shortest cookbook review ever. Duguid's cookbook is one of the most beautiful you will ever see. The presentation reminds me of Claudia Roden's seminal cookbooks, with history, stories, and photographs among the recipes. You will not regret owning this wonderful book. Music is at the heart of this beautiful, powerful novel, winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General's Literary Award for Fiction.

Politics and art run through it as well. You don't need 10 pages to get into the novel; the opening sentence will suffice: "In a single year, my father left us twice. One of the central questions of the novel is how individuals can continue to express themselves when expression is forbidden. The author is Canadian and a Montrealer; what more do we want! Ashraf Marwan was a high-ranking Egyptian official who secretly worked for the Mossad. As President Nasser's son-in-law and an adviser to his successor Anwar Sadat, Marwan had access to the biggest Egyptian secrets.

Marwan escaped detection until his suspicious death in Bar-Joseph, a professor of political science at the University of Haifa and a respected expert on Israeli intelligence, has written a riveting book which discusses Marwan's motives, how his secret identity was exposed, and how the information he provided was properly and improperly used. Espionage is in the news on a daily basis and still has the ability to change history. This is an engaging, sturdy board book for preschoolers by celebrated Canadian children's poet Dennis Lee.

The clever rhymes are enhanced by Sandy Nichols' delightful coloured artwork which features a cute bear cub who feasts on a heap of garbage. Fun to listen to and a delight to look at, this board book gets top marks! If you want to read a book about a most unusual collaboration in the annals of science, this is the book for you. If you want to read a book about one of the most unusual love stories ever recorded, this is the book for you. If you want to read a book about two young Israeli psychologists, Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, who are completely opposite in temperament and personality, whose extraordinary relationship is destroyed because of envy, here it is.

But, this is also a captivating personal story, and an examination of the groundbreaking work they did on how monumentally unreliable our intuition can be and how our biases distort our decisions. It will certainly be a hit in your home. Better yet, buy it as a gift for someone! Seasoned cooks and those that prefer simple and easy recipes will both be awed by the interesting tastes and textures. What makes the cookbook particularly unique are the beautiful photos that accompany so many of the dishes and the tidbits on variations and shortcuts provided by award-winning cookbook author Norene Gilletz for every recipe.

The cookbook has something for everyone including gluten-free recipes. Often truth is stranger than fiction, or even science fiction, and that is true of this well-researched book on one of the most enduring television and film series of all time. One of the most interesting features of the book is the recollections of hundreds of television and film executives, programmers, writers, directors, creators, and cast members.

Reading this book provides insights not just into the making of these classic dramas but also into the often intense collaborative efforts of the making of any artistic endeavour. Many of you are old friends of Steve Cohen and others have heard him speak on television or at a local venue. Now we have a concise memoir with some of the background to those intriguing Middle East encounters.

The book once again emphasizes the importance of continuing the dialogue, no matter how difficult and intractable the political situation. In the afterword, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian diplomat and the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations, makes it clear, "Today, the need for a new generation of Steve Cohens - individuals outside the traditional positions of power People always ask me why they should read a particular book; we are in the room, so to speak, when the Scud missiles hit Tel Aviv during the first Gulf War.

Yitzhak Rabin refused to go into a sealed room. There was panic in Tel Aviv and an exodus to Jerusalem. The damage was limited but it was a moment when Rabin realized, "Before the Arabs got their hands on weapons of mass destruction, Israel had to find a way to make peace. He was also prescient, "The Arabs would absorb the lesson from the Gulf War, as he had, and make the development of missile-borne chemical or biological weapons a high priority in the coming years.

This novel explores the trials and tribulations of the Bergman family: Joy and Aaron, the elderly parents, and their two children, Molly and Daniel.

Favorite books for 1st graders

Joy, 84 years old and still working full-time at a small museum in New York City, is caring for her ailing husband Aaron, who is dealing with dementia and the after-effects of bowel cancer. She loves him so much that she cannot bear the thought of a nursing home, so she hires someone to help her at home. This is a tender, funny, inter-generational story about searching for where you belong as your family changes with age.

This is a beautifully illustrated baby book in which parents can record their infant's first tooth, first words, and other milestones in their baby's life. It is formatted a bit like a scrapbook with a lot of space for crafting and collages. The journal provides two pages for every month in the first two years of the child's life in addition to many more quirky sections such as the baby's first boat ride or favourite songs. This little portable volume is a great gift for a new parent! First of all, it's a big book, not just in size but the myriad of comic and serious situations thrown at us.

The main character, the Bloch family, 21st century American Jews in crisis, both personal and social. Where exactly are they and where does Israel of today fit into their lives and identities? If Israel is destroyed by an earthquake, what does it matter to any of them? Foer exposes the possibility of a schism between Israeli Jews and Diaspora Jews that we are just beginning to recognize with some of our youth questioning the older generations' loyalty.

The writing is very funny, ironic, and smart, even brilliant. People always ask me if there are any new books on Montreal. This new coffee table book is sure to please you, with many historical photographs, some by famous photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson and William Notman. Nadeau, a local historian, provides an introductory essay and annotates a selection of photographs as well. This is a very special children's picture book. It tells the story of Paul Erd? The book tells a simplified version of his life and follows Erd? The illustrations are full of numbers and mathematical symbols and the background images are often based on prime numbers.

Noga, a concert musician with an orchestra from the Netherlands, selected to play the harp in Mozart's Concerto for Flute and Harp, is called to Israel for the funeral of her father. Honi, her brother, convinces their mother to try a retirement home in Tel Aviv for three months. Irish Examiner. Retrieved 27 October Retrieved 17 January BBC News. Retrieved 6 December The Encyclopedia of Popular Music. Omnibus Press. Retrieved 15 May Historical Dictionary of Popular Music.

Smash Hits. Archived from the original on 31 March Billboard : 5. Retrieved 24 June Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 18 March Retrieved 3 January Donegal Democrat. Retrieved 25 March Irish Roots. Archived from the original on 20 August Retrieved 8 August The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 25 November Warner Music. Hot Press. Archived from the original on 4 March Retrieved 13 February The London Times. Retrieved 8 February Company Check.

Navigation menu

Retrieved 25 February Geffen Records USA. January Retrieved 22 March Gael-Linn Records. CEF The Sunday Independent. Irish Connections. Retrieved 10 February Island Visual Arts. ISTA IR Retrieved 4 August Inside Borders. Retrieved 23 July Warner Music Australia. Archived from the original on 3 July The Sunday Chronicle.

Official Charts. Archived from the original on 13 July Retrieved 3 July Retrieved 1 January You Mail on Sunday. Retrieved 4 July Orange Coast : , Billboard : 11, Song to Soul. Episode in Japanese and English. Event occurs at — WEA Japan. Record Mirror. Retrieved 5 January Retrieved 2 January Boston Globe. Warner Reprise Video. Music Week. Retrieved 6 January Archived from the original on 3 September Retrieved 18 December A Very Special Christmas. Los Angeles Daily News. I don't think of how much I will sell". Retrieved 19 March Rolling Stone. Retrieved 21 March The Irish Times.

Retrieved 12 February Billboard : The Belfast Telegraph. Archived from the original on 19 July Retrieved 16 May University of Ulster. Archived from the original on 24 February Retrieved 20 March Archived from the original on 29 December Business Insider. Retrieved 27 November Retrieved 7 October Retrieved 8 October Retrieved 19 November Retrieved 1 December JIJI Press. News Photo". Retrieved 21 April Song-My, My Time Flies. My nine-year-old daughter, a budding scholar, recently asked me if Jews continued to be killed en masse after the Holocaust.

I told her that there were some pogroms after the war, but that there were also many before as well. An outstanding new book tells the story of the pogrom in Kishinev over three days in April in which 49 Jews were killed and were raped or wounded. The author's meticulous research led to the discovery of long-lost documents. The impetus for the book is that this event was for the most part poorly reported at the time and misconstrued over the years.

Zipperstein does much to correct this. I was impressed by this novel from the opening line, "In our parents went away and left us in the care of two men who may have been criminals. A group of strange, colorful characters, perhaps former spies, frequently move in and out of their house. Nathaniel, the narrator of the novel, reflects on this period of his life as a year-old man. Warlight, the title, refers to that murky, ambient half-light that was meant to protect the populace during the war by helping to guide people during the blackouts; it may have had a different effect on Nathaniel.

The light, by definition, isn't clear; it isn't meant to illuminate, but to guide. Warlight is also a reflection of Nathaniel's somewhat dim memory of secrets that he is struggling to uncover. What a wonderfully inspiring novel! The story is told by Charlie St. Clair, a pregnant, unmarried American college student on the verge of being thrown out by her family in The novel is also told from the perspective of Eve Gardiner, who is unexpectedly recruited to spy on the Germans in and becomes part of a vast network of secret agents.

I was not disappointed. The two women, each suffering loss from different wars, bond together in a storyline that tells of grace and courage under extreme duress, wartime glory, and sacrifice. When New York Times editor Weisman was attacked on Twitter by a swell of neo-Nazis and anti-Semites, he stopped to think about how the Jewish experience changed, especially under the current leadership in the United States.

He examines the dissonance between his concept of his Jewish identity with the that of his detractors and supporters. Weisman explores the rise of the alt-right, with its origins in older anti-Semitic organizations and the peculiar archaicism of their grievances, which are concealed in modern language. The author contends that the alt-right's aims are to disseminate hate in an acceptable manner through a political environment that has swiftly become receptive to their views.

The book concludes with suggestions about what responsible citizens should do next, including coming to the aid of other groups which are even more marginalized. In a series of letters, Halevi wishes to unravel the ideological and emotional strands of the knot that prevents peace in the region. He feels pride, faith, anguish, and anger as a Jew living in Jerusalem since Even though Halevi is addressing an anonymous Palestinian neighbor, he is actually speaking to all of us to help us understand the painful choices Israelis and Palestinians will need to make to foster a lasting peace.

The best books are the ones that surprise you and Pachinko did just that. A tale of sorrow and challenges, a story with hardship, indifference and questionable morality, the book captured my attention from beginning to end. I admit, I know nothing about Korea and Japan but thoroughly enjoyed the historical fiction. The novel centres around Sunja, the only daughter of a crippled fisherman, who falls in love with a wealthy stranger near her home in Korea.

Once she discovers she is pregnant and her lover is already married, she makes the decision to leave her home and marries a sweet, kind and sickly minister on his way to Japan. The story takes the reader through several generations who fight to control their future as they are exiled from Korea, their homeland, and must make a life for themselves, strangers in a strange land, in Japan.

Science meets the culinary arts in the most unique cookbook I have ever seen. Each section has a flavor matrix, an infographic featuring all of the data the author was able to gather about an ingredient's aromatic compounds and its compatible ingredients, as well as its primary aromas and their subcategories. Around the perimeter of the matrix are ingredients of the aroma group that pair well with the main ingredient. There are also recipes in this book, which will absolutely change the way you cook and you will impress your dinner guests with your newfound knowledge of food and aroma pairings.

I have always said owning a bookstore is the best. Here is an example of what I mean. His encounter with a group of African asylum seekers staging a silent hunger strike in Alexanderplatz, in the former East Berlin, allows him to develop compassion and understanding. The reader simultaneously experiences this as well. There are astonishing moments of insight for Richard and for us. Osarobo,who tries to understand a map, has traveled from Niger by way of Libya to Italy to Berlin, has never seen a map of any city or country on Earth. The striking yet deceptively simple writing mirrors the modest desires of the refugees.

Motivating and encouraging are the only words to describe this first-hand memoir about an American doctor who spent several years in Jerusalem treating children with cancer. Having attended medical school in Israel, Elisha Waldman was offered an opportunity to work at Hadassah Medical Center, a dream job. His story, and those of the families he treated, is a story of accomplishment.

He offers us a glimpse into a challenging world, one where politics sometimes interfered with care for the children he was treating and patients' religious beliefs and traditions sometimes made it difficult for him to provide appropriate care. The tale is inspirational and easy to read. No matter what your politics are, doctors like Dr. Waldman give hope for peace in the Middle East. This picture book is about Eli and his Zaida. Every Sunday morning Eli waits for his grandfather to deliver fresh, chewy, salty bagels from Merv's Bakery.

Sometimes Eli is lucky enough to accompany Zaida. On these occasions, he gets a pickle from a big jar. Then one Sunday, Zaida phones Eli to tell him that he slipped on "schmutz" at Merv's and can't deliver bagels for two weeks. Not only is Eli disappointed, but so are Zaida's elderly gentleman neighbours. Eli visits him, bringing chicken soup and library books. One morning Eli surprises Zaida and his neighbors with fresh bagels from Merv's.

Zaida is so proud that he declares Eli "The Bagel King. The themes of the story are inter-generational family relationships, the importance of rituals, and neighbours. The colour illustrations by Sandy Nichols beautifully depict the characters' facial expressions and hand gestures. I highly recommend this book for ages Walter Neisser helped more than fifty members of his family escape Nazi Germany, many of them to Peru.

The people who fled were limited in what they could take with them; it is remarkable that some chose to bring personal letters, thus preserving family history in correspondence. This extraordinary story is told partly through these letters, which have been translated by Walter's niece, Eva, a Montrealer, who also provides context and commentary throughout this engrossing book. Rasminsky, another Montrealer, helped edit the book. Photographs are generously interspersed throughout. Israel is often portrayed in negative terms politically and culturally, but a story that is often overlooked is its outsized role in developing innovations to help address key global challenges such as health and hunger.

Jorisch contends that Israeli culture is a major reason why there are more start-ups in the country than in Canada, India, Japan, Korea, and the United Kingdom combined. The author is a veteran entrepreneur and Middle East expert who has served in the U. Departments of Treasury and Defense. You will find the book impossible to put down. Gavin takes us on a tour of twenty countries, from Poland to Morocco, uncovering Jewish vegetarian dishes that have been handed down through the generations. Vegetarian eating is now in vogue more than ever as people discover the delights in eating healthy foods.

The author provides some historical context prior to each section of the book. The photographs are unusually down-to-earth for a cookbook, and the recipes are easy to follow. One of the most marvelous things about the book is how the author evokes the atmosphere of America in the early s, not just descriptions of clothes or cars, but also radio music: Benny Goodman, Count Basie, and the Andrew Sisters. The main character, Anna, a year-old woman, works in the Brooklyn Naval Yard, and wants to be a diver repairing ships assisting in the war effort, which is extremely dangerous work.

This is quite an ambition for a woman in s New York. Among many interesting facts in this book is that the diving suit weighs two hundred pounds! So we have gangsters, sailors, union men, divers, all the makings of a good historical novel. Just in time for Israel's 70th anniversary, this book celebrates the modern beauty of the region with photographs from the nineteenth century to today.

The most striking feature of the book is that older photographs are adjacent to Elise Theriault's photographs of the exact same locale in The changes are remarkable, profound, and exciting. Oprah Winfrey's enthusiasm for books continues. Celestial and Roy are young, black, middle-class, and in love.

She is an artist and Roy is a promising executive. After serving five years of a twelve-year prison sentence, his conviction is overturned. We witness the devastation of a marriage and friendships. The characters are well-developed and memorable. Jones makes many references to black culture, prose, poetry, and music and leaves us with much material to digest and process. This is a novel well worth reading. The bias starts early. In the course of Lipman's research, she found that "once children hit school age, teachers- even female teachers- subconsciously believe boys are better at math than girls.

In one study, when a group of teachers graded math tests with no names on them, the girls outscored the boys. But when another group of teachers graded the same tests with names, the results were reversed: they gave higher grades to the boys than the girls. All of the teachers, by the way, were female. Men are not the enemy. Men feel resentful and victimized. Men have a different response: they yell! There is a separate section of footnotes if you care to follow up on a particular study cited.

I was surprised at how such a complicated and potentially dry subject could be so entertaining. Lipman's achievement is that the book is simultaneously resonant and fascinating. The Talmud says: "If someone comes to kill you, rise up and kill him first. The author does not just describe the events but explores the moral ramifications as well.

The many photographs add a visual element to this gripping book. This is truly a must-read for anyone interested in the modern history of the Middle East and the world at large. This new graphic memoir written and illustrated by Chast of The New Yorker fame is both a primer on how to live in Manhattan, a bit of personal history, and a funny and charming love letter to the city of New York. Begun as a guide to give her daughter who was moving from the suburbs to Manhattan where Chast lived for a long time , this book teaches the tourist or the person who just moved to Manhattan how to get around on foot, how to use the subway, how to understand addresses, and much more.

But it is also for people who love the city and want to see it from a different point of view. This is a fast-paced suspense thriller. At the beginning, I was reading so quickly I forgot to note the quality of the writing, which was quite good. A private plane takes off from Martha's Vineyard and within minutes the plane crashes and there are only two survivors, a 4-year-old boy and a passenger who embarked at the last moment.

He saves the boy by swimming with him to safety. The novel looks at the passengers' lives before the crash; each chapter features a passenger or investigator. Hawley delves into each character, who initially exists only on the surface. We get to know them as admirable, flawed human beings. The plot moves forward by small, chance encounters, just as in life.

They are some biting lines and commentary. One of the characters, Layla, is vaping, while another looks at her and observes, "This is what the future looks like. We smoke technology now. They do not give you facts or truth or even an accurate account of an event but speculation and innuendo instead. They literally manufacture the news. We live in a ubiquitous hour news cycle that is corrupting public discourse.

There is even a name for it now: "hate porn. Don't forget that this is a really good story.

This collection of essays features more than forty portraits of leading Jewish thinkers, artists, scientists, and other public figures of the last hundred years who, in their own unique ways, engaged with and helped shape the modern world. The writers are a diverse group of leading international scholars. This is a welcome new book and the photos are well-chosen. Although a tiny book in size, there are 26 delicious Jewish appetizers and party snack recipes representing different countries around the world. Stories filled with historical and personal context, photographs for each dish, helpful tips on how to create a Jewish cheese plate, and what foods to buy rather than make are bonuses to the recipes.

Traditional Jewish foods have been modernized. Gefilte fish is now gefilte fritters. Little Book of Appetizers makes for a thoughtful thank you gift. One is unlikely to meet many characters in literature like Emerence the name means worthy of merit. She is a cleaner, housekeeper, and concierge for many people in her Budapest Pest neighborhood.

Emerence is physically powerful and expresses her opinions like a general giving orders to her troops. Secrets, complex and hidden, surround the reader, such as: What was going on in this neighborhood for the past 40 years? What do we really know about the past? There are clues and hints everywhere that build the tension in this quietly dramatic page-turner. I always find it fascinating reading books that take place in another era. My Hungarian customers assure me the translator got it right. This English version comes nearly 30 years after the original publication date.

Rolling Stone magazine is known as much for its excellent journalism as its photographs so it is fitting that this generous coffee-table book is filled with both. Among the many iconic pictures are snapshots that may be less known to you. Thompson wrote seminal pieces for the magazine. Profiles of popular music performers and politicians, and well as hard-hitting analyses of social issues have been featured in the magazine for decades. This book would make a great gift for any age, even a young person who is curious about the last several fascinating decades. Intriguing, riveting and tense, The Break reads like a mystery.

Each chapter introduces yet another character who is related, directly and indirectly, to the victim. The story is actually quite simple. Stella, a young mother, looks out her window and sees what seems like someone in trouble on the Break, a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house. Stella calls the police and the tale proceeds from there. The novel slowly unfolds as we see the characters grow, change, and deal with loss.

The book explores interesting facets of Aboriginal people living in a rural society and how different generations in one family can have completely separate views. The novel shows the inner workings of families as they all come together to deal with hardship.

For people who love seeing how all the pieces and characters coalesce in the end, this is definitely a book I would recommend. It tackles relevant issues in our society and it is important that everyone, especially high school students, become aware of these issues. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and hope to read more books like this one. It was all around, a happy time for most people. Students were on vacation. I never thought much of the history, meaning, or customs of Christmas. All that changed with Judith Flanders' fascinating and well-researched account in her new non-fiction book.

For rulers it became a display of power. Flanders debunks commonly-held beliefs about the holiday in a witty and intelligent way. The book is fun to read in a way that such books usually are not. There is a consistent tone and intimacy to these photographs of well-known people in the arts, athletics, and political spheres. Turning the pages is like going to an art gallery. There is an alphabetical listing of the subjects at the end of this gorgeous book. This would make a great gift during the holiday season. If you already read his entire bibliography, this publication should be a great addition to your collection, or if you just want a smart, funny, pretty book to give as a gift to a child, this is also a great choice.

Krauss' latest novel is surprisingly original in its imaginative sweep or maybe not for those who have read her books before. She poses some very mystical questions, like being in two places at once, or the harm we do ourselves by neglecting the spritual. And then we have some marvelous characters. Jules Epstein is an intelligent, rich, cultured New Yorker who wakes up one day and decides to give away much of his wealth. Nicole, like Krauss, is a writer who suffers from writer's block and is obsessed with the Tel Aviv Hilton, another 'character' in the book, which she thinks is the best example of ugly in architecture.

Ruth Westheimer, and many, many more. This book will make an excellent gift. Maybe dinosaurs don't have bedtimes, but little boys do. What does Mommy do when her little boy, Mo, is obsessed with dinosaurs and insists that he is one and can do everything dinosaurs can? This charming picture book helps answer the question through Mommy's playful interactions with Mo.

Mo insists that dinosaurs don't have dinnertimes, bath times, milktimes, and definitely no bedtimes. They are dirty, messy, cold, noisy, and never tired. Timothy Knapman's hilarious story, along with Nikki Dyson's funny, colourful and bigger than life art, make this story a perfect read-aloud bedtime story for children aged If you know Elizabeth Strout, you must read this latest novel; if you don't, you are in for a treat. Tolstoy taught us, "Each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way," and Strout just proves it again.

The reader is placed, really projected, into the middle of a drama. Slowly, in an intriguing way, things become clear. Though hazy at first, clues are dropped that make one want to continue and discover where a particular thread of the story will lead. Sometimes it's a name you haven't heard before or a peculiar gesture by one of the characters, or an awkward moment when three of the saddest, unhappy, poor children come together as adults understanding and caring for each other after 17 years.

The writing is deceptively simple but powerful: "That cup of tea, Dottie saw, gave her permission to talk. A master of structure, Strout keeps us riveted to these inter-connected stories. I thought of this book as a large tapestry that you cannot take in all at once; you have to look closely to see specific details but pull back to see the integrated whole. They remain days on which even Jews estranged from Judaism for much of the year come to synagogue, and the world's longest courtroom drama continues: the extended argument between God and His people about the fate of justice and the justice of fate that has been running since the day when Abraham first called God "Judge of all the earth," and that led Albert Einstein to speak about that "almost fanatical love of justice" that made him thank his stars that he was born a Jew.

Customers are always asking us for books on Canada which they can give as gifts to family and friends. Well, look no further. The companion book to the current exhibit at Ryerson University, The Faraway Nearby features hundreds of photographs of Canada during its first years seen through many different lenses, both photographic and categorical. Thoughtful essays are interspersed with the photos. Photos often tell stories that history forgot, such as the photograph of two young women doing aptitude tests in order to qualify for work at defense plants during the Second World War.

There is definitely something for everyone in this book. Three farmers commit suicide around the same time in a small village. Do you believe that? The novel depicts rural life of a moshava in s British Palestine and also transports you to the present. Varda, a young woman who is writing a history of the moshava, interviews Ruta, who has lived there since she was a child. Ruta tells a story that is markedly different than that found in the moshava archives. The book is smart, wise, funny, and Shalev even gives us a great tip on how to make limoncello I enjoyed the biblical illusions, but don't be concerned- they are explained in the text.

They add to the book's warm tone. The novel is violent at times as murder and revenge are present in the incredibly quiet, pastoral atmosphere. There is a strange feeling as the reader sympathizes with a murderer and is drawn in as the cycle of revenge takes over. As usual, Shalev does not disappoint his faithful readers. This book, timed to coincide with Montreal's th anniversary, celebrates the urban art of the city.

Feinberg's interest in this was piqued about ten years ago by the intricate images and social commentary of these works of art. The author also notes that these modern tapestries reflect the talent of the many men and women of our city. The collection of photographs tells you where you can find the art, which was one of the author's main goals in cataloguing it in the first place. The book makes a great gift whether you live here or not.

The book's design is striking and innovative. Each 2-page spread is a colourful infographic depicting, on one half of the book, something that is underground, and on the other half, something that is underwater. It covers everything from tunnels made by wildlife to man-made installations. The text is in the form of speech bubbles next to what it is describing, so reading this book is a dynamic and fun activity.

Enjoy it with the curious children in your life! This is a most unusual novel- it is in the form of a memoir. It's hard to imagine one could be executed for writing an opera but that was a real possibility in Soviet Russia, the night Stalin went to the opera and wrote a review. The composer, young Dmitri Shostakovich, fears for his life, his family, his music. This is a struggle that will continue throughout his life. Shostakovich has constant "conversations with Power," i.

Stalin, the bureaucracy, and its petty officials. At one point, he is so terrified of being taken away, he sleeps on the landing outside his apartment door with a packed suitcase so his wife won't see him being dragged away. The novel about the place of art in society is built on three "conversations with Power:" , when he writes his opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, his trip to America during which he extols the virtues of the Soviet Union, and finally, , when he agrees to join the Party. Each one involves great shame, humiliation, fear, and profound feelings of cowardice. At the same time he is lauded as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century.

Will his music endure above The Noise of Time? Read the book, listen to his 5th symphony, or go to the opera. You decide. Arturo Toscanini is regarded by many as one of the greatest conductors of the twentieth century, and this definitive biography by Sachs, a Toscanini scholar, is a must for any lover of classical music or well-researched books. He had a complex personal life alongside his famous musical successes, but his bold defiance against the tyrants of the era stands out in any time period.

In , Toscanini refused to allow his La Scala orchestra to play the Fascist anthem "Glovinezza," despite much pressure from Mussolini.

  • The Vegas Knockout (Duffy Dombrowski Mystery);
  • A Pianists A–Z: A piano lovers reader;
  • Lesbian Love Affair.
  • Précis de versification (Cursus) (French Edition)!
  • Alles unter einem Hut: Lyrische Betrachtungen und Gedichte (German Edition).
  • Children's?

As well, when tens of thousands of Jewish refugees streamed into Palestine in the late s, he traveled there to establish an orchestra of refugee musicians. The author had access to family archives and interviewed many relatives and associates in order to complete this monumental work. This is an excellent reference book for year olds.

The colourful, eye-catching pages and short, simple text make it a perfect introduction to the solar system and exploration into space. Both were inspired at an early age to follow space careers. I highly recommend this book. Perhaps it will inspire our next generation of scientists or astronauts. Gundar-Goshen, winner of the Sapir Prize for best debut fiction, One Night, Markovitch, has written a novel which takes place in Israel, but it isn't about Zionism, or Judaism, or the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Our main characters are African immigrants, Eritreans, Sudanese, and a brilliant neurosurgeon, Eitan Green, and his beautiful wife, who is a police detective. Eitan's connection to his two young boys is so deep in ways not usually described in a father. There is plenty of humiliation, guilt, and love in this book. There is also extortion and shame. So many interesting themes in this fast-paced novel! If I had only one word to describe this novel it would be intense.

This is an incredible box of treasures on Israel. Included are four books covering a multitude of cultural and intellectual fields; four DVDs featuring different aspects of what makes Israel special and unique; a photographic portfolio of 25 frameable prints celebrating wondrous landscapes; a USB flash drive featuring vignettes about Israeli achievements and innovators; and a limited-edition scarf designed especially for this project by Philip Blau and Helena Blaunstein. This makes a great gift. It comes with a CD of 20 excerpts from recordings of important pieces written by well-known composers, ranging from Beethoven to Britten.

All the music is selected because it is reminiscent of water, which the written parts of the book emphasize. The biographies of the composers and definitions of musical terms are adapted for children. This is a great gift for the children in your life. This is one of the best novels I have ever read. The novel opens on April 12, President Lincoln and his wife are hosting a ball; their young son Willie, upstairs, is deathly ill and dying.

The Civil War is raging and casualties are mounting. With this background, Saunders gives us one of the most beautifully written, sensitive accounts of love, grief, and endurance one can imagine. And that is even before we talk about slavery and ghosts! Yes, ghosts; not usually to my taste but this novel is at once a feat of imagination and utterly realistic.

Even though we are among ghosts in the Bardo a transitional state in the Hindu religion for two hundred pages, it's amusing, funny, and at times, hilarious. Each voice, each character, has his or her own distinctive tone. It is fun to guess who is speaking before you see the source, which brings me to the unusual collage structure of this novel, not always a straight narrative but always entertaining, with many voices, some contemporary newspaper or diary accounts, and a main character, Lincoln, to whom the reader needs no introduction.

The ghosts are like a chorus commenting on Lincoln's grief, the tragedy of the Civil War, and the human condition, for any of us that still care.

  • Bleach, Vol. 12: Flower on the Precipice!
  • Andy Warhol Technology;
  • The Prostitute.
  • Lo sconosciuto che ti è accanto (Italian Edition)!
  • Contact Us.

New York in the first half of the twentieth century was an explosive time for art. There is currently a new exhibit of the work of Stettheimer, one of the great American artists of the century. The beautiful book combines reproductions of her artwork and poetry. This is a humourous picture book for children aged If you want to make dragons happy and get them on your side, throw a party and serve tacos.

It can be any kind; chicken or beef, big or small. Do not serve the tacos with spicy salsa. This will cause havoc- ears to smoke, sparks to fly, and definitely stomach upset. Unfortunately, the young boy in the story hosting the party didn't read the fine print on a jar of mild salsa. The playfully coloured illustrations with dragons of various sizes, shapes and colours enhance the amusing text and provide some clues that are not present in Rubin's words. This light-hearted, laugh-out-loud book is sure to entertain.

This story will make you laugh, smile, and think. If you have read Grossman before, you might wonder at a main character, Dovaleh Greenstein, who is a stand-up comic, but Grossman, among all his other talents, is superb at stand-up comedy. Regarding the soul, which requires "nonstop upkeep," he doesn't have the resources to maintain one: "Every single day, all day long, you gotta haul it in for servicing", so forget soul searching.

The humor is painful at times; in a riff on Mengele, you will find yourself smiling inside and fearful at the same time, wanting relief from this joke, but one is unable to stop reading as this comedy speeds toward tragedy. We continue on to explore how damaged one can be when brought up by parents who are survivors or escaped "seconds" before Mengele could "declare his short consultation: right, left, left, left You will laugh out loud as you realize how a sweet kid became a bully and an abused kid became an abuser.

What does this imply for a country and its soul? Or is that too big a leap? Some reviewers have called it "shocking, raw, eloquent. Sandberg, the chief operating officer at Facebook and the author of Lean In, and Grant, a psychologist and Wharton professor, have written an eloquent book on tragic loss and the need to find a way to continue living. Option B is much more than just a personal story, though.

Through the telling of many others' stories, it is also an exploration of the uncanny human ability to persevere through emotional trauma and regain happiness. I expect that this book will offer reliable comfort to many people. This book, beautifully illustrated and written by R. Palacio, features Auggie from her bestselling chapter book, Wonder. The theme of acceptance will be easily understood by younger children.

Auggie, the narrator of the story, is a ten-year-old boy who does ordinary things, but looks very different from others. He is stared at, made fun of, and bullied by other children. In order to cope and feel normal, he escapes into the world of space with his dog, Daisy. Despite how poorly he is treated by others, he is not discouraged, but seems encouraged and hopeful about human capabilities.

From the cover to the illustrations to the words, the story makes the point that we are all "wonders" and the importance of seeing beyond an individual's physical appearance. It evokes much discussion and is a must-read for children and their parents. This novel is quirky, fun, sad, and elegant. As my friend Jackie, who recommended the book, said to me, "Sometimes you don't want the page to end, it's so delicious. If he steps outside, it will be off to Siberia. So he stays for over 30 years. One of the best parts of the book is the many, many colorful characters who pass through the Count's life during his confinement.

Nina, age nine, who calls him your Countship, is my favorite. Home is the big theme of this story. As Towles says, the Russians who love their land so much are the first people to send a person into exile at home! This is a novel to enjoy and relax with. The horrors of the era are still there but understated. The Count confronts injustice and the insane bureaucracy using authority, order, and manners to ward off the chaos. Most pages will bring a smile to your face. If you were playing a word association game, and someone said the word 'Passover,' the first word out of your mouth will probably not be 'easy.

What sets this book apart is the friendliness of the authors; you feel as if they are in the kitchen with you helping you through the preparations for the seder meals. This new book by the Japanese author Megumi Iwasa is a delightful, simple, and funny tale about long-distance friendship. Letter writing, quite a rarity in our digital world, is key to the development of the story. The black ink illustrations add action and humour to the text. Giraffe, who lives in the African savanna, is bored and lonely and wants to share things with a friend.

He wonders what is on the other side of the horizon.