Failing Law Schools (Chicago Series in Law and Society)

The University of Chicago The Law School
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In April , she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship — one of just scholars, artists and scientists selected from a group of almost 3, applicants. In Against Progress , Professor Silbey considers intellectual property debates in law and culture as a bellwether of changing social justice needs in the 21st century.

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Based on an analysis of interviews with authors, artists, inventors and lawyers, the book challenges the traditional notion of intellectual property as merely creating financial incentives necessary to spur innovation. And, is the author of numerous law review articles and publications in other venues. In addition to her research on intellectual property, she writes and speaks about the use of film as a legal tool body cams, surveillance video, medical imaging and the representations of law in popular culture courtroom dramas, reality television. Harry Potter. Popular Features.

New Releases. Failing Law Schools.

Description On the surface, law schools today are thriving. Enrollments are on the rise, and their resources are often the envy of every other university department.

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Yet behind the flourishing facade, law schools are failing abjectly. Recent front-page stories have detailed widespread dubious practices, misleading placement reports, and the fundamental failure to prepare graduates to enter the profession. Addressing all these problems and more in a ringing critique is renowned legal scholar Brian Z. Piece by piece, Tamanaha lays out the how and why of the crisis and the likely consequences if the current trend continues.

At the heart of the problem, he argues, are the economic demands and competitive pressures on law schools - driven by competition over U. News and World Report ranking.

Failing Law Schools

When paired with a lack of regulatory oversight, the work environment of professors, the limited information available to prospective students, and loan-based tuition financing, the result is a system that is fundamentally unsustainable. With "Failing Law Schools", Tamanaha has provided the perfect resource for assessing what's wrong with law schools and figuring out how to fix them. Product details Format Hardback pages Dimensions x x Other books in this series.

The Language of Statutes Lawrence M. Add to basket. Failing Law Schools Brian Z. Justice in the Balkans John Hagan. Working Law Lauren B. This call has been to a large degree driven by the crisis in the legal services market brought on by the economic recession, and the subsequent decline of jobs in conventional law firms.

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On the surface, law schools today are thriving. Enrollments are on the rise, and their resources are often the envy of every other university department. Law. Yet behind the flourishing facade, law schools are failing abjectly. Recent front- page Chicago Series in Law and Society. Author, Brian Z.

In the United States, arguably the loudest but by no means the first country to seek educational reform, the focus is often on the relationship between law as taught in the classroom and law as practiced in the real world. Moreover, many of these educators are aware that legal education should — at least in theory — be educating students to become global citizens and leaders of the future. The increasingly global character of domestic jurisdictions is forcing many law schools to reassess their modes of training.

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It is now widely recognized that many areas of law are at some level interrelated, involve state and non-state normative orderings, and to varying degrees cross national and transnational jurisdictions. Against this backdrop, I argue for the embracing of an ethnographic approach in reforming legal education.

By presenting a grounded law-in-action approach through ethnographic engagement, students, I suggest, will be better positioned to appreciate first-hand that there exist deep relations between laws, cultures, politics and economies. This appreciation will in turn enable students to think more explicitly about differentials of power as well as the importance of social and ethical consequences involved in legal interactions.

But many others — and dare I say that these educators tend to be of a younger generation — see the need to engage with a moral imagination as vital for the continuing relevance and ongoing transformation of the legal profession. Legal ethnographers have been central in forging new lines of inquiry about the relations between laws, cultures and various modes of power.

Importantly, these scholars are concerned with how people think about and engage with law, and how they accommodate, negotiate and change legal practices over time. So while most people think of ethnography as referring to a particular methodological approach, it also presents a perspective that privileges people over texts.